Bryan King's New Book

ParisWall

Well-known member
Lion 1964:True... it was a platen. I started my carrer in pre press in 1966 ( yes I’m old fucker) and It was the beginning of the end for letterpress. As a learner (not apprentice) one of my jobs was to deliver print shops with litho plates. One shop was still using a Platen and when watching it working it was almost hypnotic! I have never been involved in letterpress only litho so I am surprised that Whisky’s book is printed in letterpress (if it is effectively the case....which I doubt) so again if I have missed a chapter can somebody or Whisky enlighten me! Cheers
It's just me pissing about mate; hoping Whisky was planning on printing Bryan's book in the traditional method!

I tell you what though Gerry, I wish I had some of those letterpress type cases plus fonts and a small platen press.

Have you seen how much companies are changing for a one-day letterpress workshop?

The seminars are very popular with the Hoxton brigade, Media students and the arty farty crowd - going back to their roots, so to speak.

So, if you see any old printing equipment on your travels, snap it up.

:thumbup:
 

whiskylion

Well-known member
It's just me pissing about mate; hoping Whisky was planning on printing Bryan's book in the traditional method!

I tell you what though Gerry, I wish I had some of those letterpress type cases plus fonts and a small platen press.

Have you seen how much companies are changing for a one-day letterpress workshop?

The seminars are very popular with the Hoxton brigade, Media students and the arty farty crowd - going back to their roots, so to speak.

So, if you see any old printing equipment on your travels, snap it up.

:thumbup:
Believe me: if I had been able to print Bryan's book on letterpress, I would have done so!

Perhaps we, along with 64 and Jerry, should set up a new movement: Campaign for Real Artisan Printing.

CRAP.
 

Lion1964

Well-known member
Lion 1964:True... it was a platen. I started my carrer in pre press in 1966 ( yes I’m old fucker) and It was the beginning of the end for letterpress. As a learner (not apprentice) one of my jobs was to deliver print shops with litho plates. One shop was still using a Platen and when watching it working it was almost hypnotic! I have never been involved in letterpress only litho so I am surprised that Whisky’s book is printed in letterpress (if it is effectively the case....which I doubt) so again if I have missed a chapter can somebody or Whisky enlighten me! Cheers
Gerry you are real old school then ,when it was a skilled trade.
I started in 1980 on 2 colour conventional damping presses
mate.
Done a 4 year apprenticeship with an advanced c&g diploma.
I Finished with print over a year , running a 10 colour Heidelberg. No jobs anymore, trade dead with digital and automation.
Retraining as a spark now at my age doing another c&g diploma upto level 3 and 18th edition, now on portfolio.
Used to love printing football programmes and record sleeves , all so easy now pressing buttons with access colour control etc.
 

Lion1964

Well-known member
Believe me: if I had been able to print Bryan's book on letterpress, I would have done so!

Perhaps we, along with 64 and Jerry, should set up a new movement: Campaign for Real Artisan Printing.

CRAP.
I hope my copy will be in fit whiskers bound to perfection I trust.
 

whiskylion

Well-known member
I hope my copy will be in fit whiskers bound to perfection I trust.
I hope so, mate, I hope so. Because of Covid, can't get along to check.

But if you want to see old school work of art, go to the shop at Littlehellbooks.com and have a gander at the leather-bound Millwall: Lions of the South.

That was hand bound back in 1988 by the chap who used to do all the work for The Queen for all her stud books. He was then regarded Britain's finest bookbinder in his day and the brief was simple: use the very finest materials you can procure.

It was actually printed and bound to higher specs than the Queen's stuff!!

Not sure they've put pictures up if the marbled endpapers.

Anyway, enjoy the view.
 

ParisWall

Well-known member
Gerry you are real old school then ,when it was a skilled trade.
I started in 1980 on 2 colour conventional damping presses
mate.
Done a 4 year apprenticeship with an advanced c&g diploma.
I Finished with print over a year , running a 10 colour Heidelberg. No jobs anymore, trade dead with digital and automation.
Retraining as a spark now at my age doing another c&g diploma upto level 3 and 18th edition, now on portfolio.
Used to love printing football programmes and record sleeves , all so easy now pressing buttons with access colour control etc.
Yes mate, print's a completely different world now.

What took ten people - compositor, designer, paste-up artist, camera operator, neg technician, CMYK comp, plate maker, pressman, binder/finisher and guillotine operator can now be done by one lad with an iMac, copy of InDesign and Photoshop plus a Ricoh C5310s Series and you're up and running!

Sad, but that's the way of the world, I'm afraid.
.
 

Lion1964

Well-known member
Yes mate, print's a completely different world now.

What took ten people - compositor, designer, paste-up artist, camera operator, neg technician, CMYK comp, plate maker, pressman, binder/finisher and guillotine operator can now be done by one lad with an iMac, copy of InDesign and Photoshop plus a Ricoh C5310s Series and you're up and running!

Sad, but that's the way of the world, I'm afraid.
.
Won’t like paris , but so true.
 

whiskylion

Well-known member
Yes mate, print's a completely different world now.

What took ten people - compositor, designer, paste-up artist, camera operator, neg technician, CMYK comp, plate maker, pressman, binder/finisher and guillotine operator can now be done by one lad with an iMac, copy of InDesign and Photoshop plus a Ricoh C5310s Series and you're up and running!

Sad, but that's the way of the world, I'm afraid.
.
I dread to think what the cost of printing a hardback book old school would cost now.

It is painful enough even with new technology.
 

Lion1964

Well-known member
I hope so, mate, I hope so. Because of Covid, can't get along to check.

But if you want to see old school work of art, go to the shop at Littlehellbooks.com and have a gander at the leather-bound Millwall: Lions of the South.

That was hand bound back in 1988 by the chap who used to do all the work for The Queen for all her stud books. He was then regarded Britain's finest bookbinder in his day and the brief was simple: use the very finest materials you can procure.

It was actually printed and bound to higher specs than the Queen's stuff!!

Not sure they've put pictures up if the marbled endpapers.

Anyway, enjoy the view.
I remember the full bound edition going on sale or might have been hardback . I sadly opted for the the cheaper version.
But a few years later did manage to get the panoramic limited edition print of the old den.
 
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Gerry

Active member
It's just me pissing about mate; hoping Whisky was planning on printing Bryan's book in the traditional method!

I tell you what though Gerry, I wish I had some of those letterpress type cases plus fonts and a small platen press.

Have you seen how much companies are changing for a one-day letterpress workshop?

The seminars are very popular with the Hoxton brigade, Media students and the arty farty crowd - going back to their roots, so to speak.

So, if you see any old printing equipment on your travels, snap it up.

:thumbup:
Paris...I left London in 1973 to continue my “apprenticeship” in Paris where I really learnt my trade which kept me in a job up until the fucking Macintosh took over in the mid 90s leaving hundreds of thousands of very skilled techniciens, me included, without a job.
Not just without a job but without a trade. Pre press, as the print world knew it disappeared without trace leaving unknowledgeable computer operators to do the job with the lack of quality that it engendered (not to mention the rock bottom salaries that went with it)
I managed to rebound in an enormous high tech international company thanks to being bi-lingual coupled with my pre-press experience and basic print knowledge in a job supervising complex bank card printing production. I am now retired since 6 years ago.
Must say that printing today is more about turning buttons on a console than anything else and not wanting to sound like an old soldier but my last years experience on press be it in the UK, Spain,France, USA or Singapore where my company had production sites left a lot to be desired as to the expertise in colour management or finding solutions when things went wrong. Glad I am no longer concerned!
 

Moody

Well-known member
Believe me: if I had been able to print Bryan's book on letterpress, I would have done so!

Perhaps we, along with 64 and Jerry, should set up a new movement: Campaign for Real Artisan Printing.

CRAP.
Surely you want to make sure people know it’s a society...

CRAPS
 

ParisWall

Well-known member
Paris...I left London in 1973 to continue my “apprenticeship” in Paris where I really learnt my trade which kept me in a job up until the fucking Macintosh took over in the mid 90s leaving hundreds of thousands of very skilled techniciens, me included, without a job.
Not just without a job but without a trade. Pre press, as the print world knew it disappeared without trace leaving unknowledgeable computer operators to do the job with the lack of quality that it engendered (not to mention the rock bottom salaries that went with it)
I managed to rebound in an enormous high tech international company thanks to being bi-lingual coupled with my pre-press experience and basic print knowledge in a job supervising complex bank card printing production. I am now retired since 6 years ago.
Must say that printing today is more about turning buttons on a console than anything else and not wanting to sound like an old soldier but my last years experience on press be it in the UK, Spain,France, USA or Singapore where my company had production sites left a lot to be desired as to the expertise in colour management or finding solutions when things went wrong. Glad I am no longer concerned!
Yes, Gerry, there was absolute carnage in Print.

I've a mate who had a Finished Proof business in Milton Keyes.

They did bespoke proofs for the Banking and Financial Sector; Balance Sheets, Statements, that sort of stuff.

Because it had 'always been done that way' every item had to be printed on the exact stock of the final print run, for presentation to the Director's of the institution.

They were buying 200 sheets of A2 paper from Switzerland at £2,000 a shot!

Of course, in those days the Banks had money to burn, but come 2008 and everything came crashing down.

The chap never recovered, and he went bankrupt.

I assume now the Directors just look at PDFs - thereby saving thousands of pounds.