Boring, Risk Averse Championship

whiskylion

Well-known member
How we all loved the Championship.

The mantra from supporters over the last couple of decades was how it was much more fun to be in than the Premier, where half the teams struggled to score on average a goal a match.

Well, guess what? If you have been bored shitless watching Championship football this season, there may be good reason. Because the Premier League disease has hit the Championship - big time!

No less than 9 of the 24 teams are showing a negative goalscoring ratio: in other words, they have scored less goals than games played. And you'll not be too surprised to hear that Millwall is amongst them.

So rare are goals these days, across the entire Championship clubs are averaging just 1.08 goals a game. Take free-scoring mavericks Blackburn (21 goals in 11 games) out of the equation and we are down to a stupefying 1.05.

This, frankly, is pathetic. And not exactly great marketing of the Championship product when people cannot attend games and are asked £10 for the privilege of watching paint dry without the fun of joining your lifetime friends for a drink before or after the game, or the craic that gets you through it.

To contextualise these figures, it means that we are averaging 2.16 goals per game - which is even a lower rate than the early 20s when the offside trap was used to make the most of the three player offside rules. Because of the lack of goals - and entertainment for the fans - the rules were changed from three opposing men between the goal and most forward attacking player to the present two. Goals per game went up by about 50%...and attendances increased, also.

At a time audiences should be wowed at home so they come flocking back when the gates reopen, they are slowly being driven away by possession football, with intricate passing patterns being weaved by players in their own box rather than the opposition's.

Slowly people are falling out of love with football. A day out looks a better option than a day in waiting for the outside chance of your team having a shot or even, miraculously, scoring. The bonds that held club and supporters so tight are one by one being loosened.

I wonder why....
 
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kinelloz

Well-known member
Can you imagine how crap it will get when they introduce VAR and have goals ruled offside because the players fingernail was in front of the defender. Can’t wait.
Don't be daft Doc, we will have the Bet365 sponsored VAR breaks to enjoy, 'PlayStation's rolling subs' and 5 penalties a game (Cooper will give away 3 a game and if Smith plays....). Just need to add in 'brought to you by McDonald's overtime' for drawn games and the 'product' will be complete.
 

TomTomFH

Well-known member
I have not watched one game this season. For me the football does not exists until I'm allowed to go and watch it live. Oh how I long for the days of watching Oldham at home in the pissing rain with 6500 others in a shitty League One season..Until then, good luck to them , but fuck the Championship. I will go and see Fisher when we are allowed again.
 

Phlion54

Well-known member
How we all loved the Championship.

The mantra from supporters over the last couple of decades was how it was much more fun to be in than the Premier, where half the teams struggled to score on average a goal a match.

Well, guess what? If you have been bored shitless watching Championship football this season, there may be good reason. Because the Premier League disease has hit the Championship - big time!

No less than 9 of the 24 teams are showing a negative goalscoring ratio: in other words, they have scored less goals than games played. And you'll not be too surprised to hear that Millwall is amongst them.

So rare are goals these days, across the entire Championship clubs are averaging just 1.08 goals a game. Take free-scoring mavericks Blackburn (21 goals in 11 games) out of the equation and we are down to a stupefying 1.05.

This, frankly, is pathetic. And not exactly great marketing of the Championship product when people cannot attend games and are asked £10 for the privilege of watching paint dry without the fun of joining your lifetime friends for a drink before or after the game, or the craic that gets you through it.

To contextualise these figures, it means that we are averaging 2.16 goals per game - which is even a lower rate than the early 20s when the offside trap was used to make the most of the three player offside rules. Because of the lack of goals - and entertainment for the fans - the rules were changed from three opposing men between the goal and most forward attacking player to the present two. Goals per game went up by about 50%...and attendances increased, also.

At a time audiences should be wowed at home so they come flocking back when the gates reopen, they are slowly being driven away by possession football, with intricate passing patterns being weaved by players in their own box rather than the opposition's.

Slowly people are falling out of love with football. A day out looks a better option than a day in waiting for the outside chance of your team having a shot or even, miraculously, scoring. The bonds that held club and supporters so tight are one by one being loosened.

I wonder why....
The above sums up the present mindset of most managers & owners.,play not to lose rathe then play to win......the England team is a classic examp!e.....needed to win against Belgium so he picks 5 defenders and 2 defensive midfielders ........went out with a wimper and we deserved no more.....no crowd to boo him and show how bad it was so it will carry on.....hope the game will change when and its a big when fans are allowed back in
 

bazzwall

Well-known member
is being turned into an academic product, ala St George’s Park. Where ability to pass a ball sideways is enough to earn you 100k a week, providing you have a unique haircut.
 

kevrelles

Well-known member
Don't be daft Doc, we will have the Bet365 sponsored VAR breaks to enjoy, 'PlayStation's rolling subs' and 5 penalties a game (Cooper will give away 3 a game and if Smith plays....). Just need to add in 'brought to you by McDonald's overtime' for drawn games and the 'product' will be complete.
And a slapper to give a blow job.
 

whiskylion

Well-known member
Just 25 goals scored in the 12 weekend Championship fixtures. Average: 2.08 goals a game......zzzzzzzzz.

But if you rightly think that is turgid enough, then just look at this: of these 25 goals no less than 13 - more than half - was supplied in just two games.

The remaining 10 games shared a mind-numbing 12 goals between them.

So the massed ranks of ten sets of fans sat in their living rooms to be treated to no less than 1.2 goals a game on average.

Truly shocking.
 

norwichmark

Well-known member
How we all loved the Championship.

The mantra from supporters over the last couple of decades was how it was much more fun to be in than the Premier, where half the teams struggled to score on average a goal a match.

Well, guess what? If you have been bored shitless watching Championship football this season, there may be good reason. Because the Premier League disease has hit the Championship - big time!

No less than 9 of the 24 teams are showing a negative goalscoring ratio: in other words, they have scored less goals than games played. And you'll not be too surprised to hear that Millwall is amongst them.

So rare are goals these days, across the entire Championship clubs are averaging just 1.08 goals a game. Take free-scoring mavericks Blackburn (21 goals in 11 games) out of the equation and we are down to a stupefying 1.05.

This, frankly, is pathetic. And not exactly great marketing of the Championship product when people cannot attend games and are asked £10 for the privilege of watching paint dry without the fun of joining your lifetime friends for a drink before or after the game, or the craic that gets you through it.

To contextualise these figures, it means that we are averaging 2.16 goals per game - which is even a lower rate than the early 20s when the offside trap was used to make the most of the three player offside rules. Because of the lack of goals - and entertainment for the fans - the rules were changed from three opposing men between the goal and most forward attacking player to the present two. Goals per game went up by about 50%...and attendances increased, also.

At a time audiences should be wowed at home so they come flocking back when the gates reopen, they are slowly being driven away by possession football, with intricate passing patterns being weaved by players in their own box rather than the opposition's.

Slowly people are falling out of love with football. A day out looks a better option than a day in waiting for the outside chance of your team having a shot or even, miraculously, scoring. The bonds that held club and supporters so tight are one by one being loosened.

I wonder why....
Kids in academies whisky well my grandsons one are taught to receive the ball from the goalkeeper and pass their way upfield. By the way say it quietly he is at Chelsea. Think I prefer the old Wimbledon style compared to what we seeing now. Smash it into oppositions box to 2 six foot sixers. Let’s have some fun.
 

whiskylion

Well-known member
Kids in academies whisky well my grandsons one are taught to receive the ball from the goalkeeper and pass their way upfield. By the way say it quietly he is at Chelsea. Think I prefer the old Wimbledon style compared to what we seeing now. Smash it into oppositions box to 2 six foot sixers. Let’s have some fun.
I think with the justifiable worries about long term brain damage, kids will never be taught to to pick up seconds from a goalkeeper punt again...

I've always been in favour of mixing it. But in yesteryear the goalkeeper would bowl the ball out to set up an attack usually with a free full back hurtling towards and beyond the half way line.

Now it's 15 passes and you are still in your own penalty area....
 

chopsboysie

Well-known member
I've always said I dont know much about football tactics and I prefer route one elbows high chop the cunt down stuff. At least that's entertaining. Passing the ball 20 times before it goes over the half way line is totally ridiculous, boring and lacks passion. Get the ball in the fucking net simple.
I played in the days when we gave a fuck and wanted to score/win by any means. Won leagues got promoted won cup finals etc with a manager shouting from the sidelines "no prisoners " we weren't popular but didn't give a fuck we were winners. Only tactics we had were route one elbows high chop the cunt down. Football is a simple game ffs
 

BrianLion

Well-known member
Just 25 goals scored in the 12 weekend Championship fixtures. Average: 2.08 goals a game......zzzzzzzzz.

But if you rightly think that is turgid enough, then just look at this: of these 25 goals no less than 13 - more than half - was supplied in just two games.

The remaining 10 games shared a mind-numbing 12 goals between them.

So the massed ranks of ten sets of fans sat in their living rooms to be treated to no less than 1.2 goals a game on average.

Truly shocking.
I love Millwall always have always will, but it’s a hard watch the football is tedious, without flair and worst of all without passion. I don’t like the current brand of massively cautious football and I hate that Millwall have bought into it, Win lose or draw I want to see Millwall attack and even if playing against better’ sides I at least want us to be fighting harder, winning more tackles/battles than the opponents I want to see a passionate Wall, at the moment it’s turgid.
 

Lionarm

Well-known member
Totally agree Whisky.
I call it "Promised Land" mentality.
The reason is that its win at all costs. Playing football, let alone attractive football is not a particular requirement, especially when there's nobody to see it. Why should it be? Remember the old Wimbledon getting (temporary) success with their brand of non-football?
Now its not even that - its not to lose at all costs. You can see that in the table where a few points separate many teams.
This will not change while football is structured the way it is.
Non-league football is far more attractive these days after you have learnt to accept the different standard.
 

Froada

Well-known member
Just watching football on Quest, and I must say the lower league football is far more exciting on what highlights they show.
 

cold blow

Well-known member
Football should be played the old Brazilian way, which is i believe called "Ginga"
ie Play from the heart.
Most footballers are too thick to understand the systems and tactics managers are telling them anyway.